I received a question today through my Yedda Ask Widget (that’s the nice little box on the right that you are more than welcome to use to ask me questions directly and have all the knowledge available on Yedda. Disclosure: Yedda is my day work 🙂 )

greenaj asked why the “-gen” parameter of the “!dumpheap” is missing from the SOS.dll that shipped with .NET Framework 2.0 (I’ve previously talked about the parameters that one can use with “!dumpheap” here, but its for the SOS that comes with WinDbg and is only good for .NET 1.1)

It seems that the SOS.dll that shipped in .NET 2.0 has, in some areas, less functionality than its sibling – SOS of .NET 1.1 – that is being updated regularly with every WinDbg version.

I did offer greenaj another way of doing that same thing without the “-gen” parameter.
It is based upon combining “!eeheap -gc” (which shows all the addresses of the various memory segments of each generation) and using the “start” and “end” command parameters of “!dumpheap“.

First, run “!eeheap -gc” and get the following output:
0:014> !eeheap -gc
Number of GC Heaps: 1
generation 0 starts at 0x013f694c
generation 1 starts at 0x013cb21c
generation 2 starts at 0x01391000
ephemeral segment allocation context: (0x01406de8, 0x01408970)
segment begin allocated size
001b2da0 7a721784 7a74248c 0x00020d08(134408)
00197dc8 7b451688 7b467f9c 0x00016914(92436)
001847b0 790d6358 790f5800 0x0001f4a8(128168)
01390000 01391000 01408970 0x00077970(489840)
Large object heap starts at 0x02391000
segment begin allocated size
02390000 02391000 0239a130 0x00009130(37168)
Total Size 0xd7564(882020)
——————————
GC Heap Size 0xd7564(882020)

The bold and underlined number, for example, shows that generation 2 start at the address of 01391000. At the list of segments below we can see that we have a segment who’s address starts at 01391000 and ends at 01408970.

Now we can run the command “!dumpheap 01391000 01408970” and see all the objects in this segments which are, in fact, all generation 2 objects (at least in this sample application).

I just hope newer versions of SOS for .NET 2.0 will be released more frequently with newer version of WinDbg, like they did with the SOS for .NET 1.1.

  • Jeff Costa

    From the !eeheap -gc command’s results, how do you discern what memory segments are from a specific generation?

  • Jeff, the output of !eeheap gives you start range address of each generation. If you’ll look at the example that I gave above you’ll see a list of all segments with their addresses and if you’ll look at the start of the output of !eeheap you’ll see that it shows for each generation that start address of the segments.

    So, as the example shows, you can figure out which segments belongs to which generation.

  • Joe

    I believe !dumpheap 01391000 01408970 returns not only gen 2 objects but also gen0 and gen 1 objects.