I was working today on figuring out some Managed C++ code with a friend from work (Oran Singer) and I just wanted to outline some of the oddities of the Managed C++ Destructors because I think it is important for everyone to understand how they work and what some of the quirks about them are.

We are still in the middle of figuring out something more serious (I will post on that later on).

I would like to “appologize” to the C#/VB.NET crowed in advance since this post is all about Managed C++ today a bit on its future, but I think it will be interesting none-the-less.

First of all, a Managed C++ class that had a destructor will include two additional methods due to the destructor:

  1. Finalize method
  2. __dtor method

Currently you cannot implement the finalize method in managed C++ directly like in C# by simply override it since it is defined as private protected in System::Object so the only way to do it is to add a destructor to the class.

This means that a Managed C++ class that has a destructor has a finalizer with all the implications of a .NET finalizer (I’ve written in more detail about finalizers here).

The __dtor is being called when you use the “delete” operator on a managed C++ class instance (IMPORTANT NOTE: You can only call “delete” on a managed C++ class instance that implements a destructor).

The implementation of the __dtor method is similar to an implementation one would put in a Dispose method when implementing the IDisposable interface. It has two function calls, one to GC.SuppressFinalize (so the finalizer thread will ignore calling the Finalize method of this instance) and a call to Finalize (to actually perform the destructor code).

Another interesting anecdote is that if you have a pure virtual class and you add a constructor to it, it must have a body even though this is a pure virtual class since there is always a virtual call to the base class’s destructor.

Looking a bit to the future, in Visual Studio 2005 (previously known as Whidbey) Visual C++ that generates managed code get a few new features that are a bit different in implementation than what we saw above.

First of all, when implementing only a destructor (“~MyClass()”) the compiler will actually fully implement the IDisposable interface and in certain cases will automatically call the Dispose method (in C# you would either use try..finally block and call the Dispose at the finally part or use the “using” keyword) in the following cases:

  • A stack based object goes out of scope
  • A class member’s enclosing object is destroyed
  • A delete is performed on the pointer or handle.

In addition to that you can explicitly implement a finalizer using the “!” tag (“!MyClass()”). That finalizer is subject to that usual finalizer rules we already know. The main advantage is that it will NOT run if you already called the destructor.

These new features allows improved control for a more deterministic cleanup and allows finer control on C++ managed objects that was previously not available.

I would like to thank Oran again for his help, mainly for forcing me to search some more on the subject and getting the idea to write this post.

  • http://ribolov-info.ru Sergey

    Has read through clause, little bit other opinion, but all the same thanks is certainly very interesting but at me, my opinion has a little changed. By the way excuse for my english at me with it not greater problems. Thanks for understanding

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