[UPDATE – 9:30AM]
[Added some of the links from Rico’s post and some more input on them]

This is a bit off topic, but I’d thought I’ll still give it a post since, as we all know, the best way to debug is to not debug at all. Avoiding common pitfalls and understanding how things work can save hours of debugging work at a later time.

Anyhow, I’ve stumbled upon a post by Rico Mariani in his blog about Whidbey Performance Opportunities.

(SIDE NOTE: his blog is full of interesting things since his current position is in the CLR performance team. If there is someone that knows how to squeeze extra performance from the CLR that’s him)

This post talks about some of the new things Whidbey (Visual Studio 2005) has to offer as well as the new .NET CLR 2.0.

The post offer links to each subject with additional information such as:

  • Review by Jason Zander of NGen – Its a little old but give a good insight as to what this tool does and how and when to use it. Keep in mind, as stated in the post, that NGen in v1.0 and v1.1 was mainly created for usage of the runtime itself. It got revamped a bit in Whidbey so that it is much better.
  • NGen is only good for a specific version of the CLR. If a new service pack was installed, there is a need to re-NGen your assemblies, otherwise their native image will be ignored and they will be considered as standard .NET assemblies that were not NGen’ed. As part of WinFX (which will be released in Windows codenamed Longhorn, now named Windows Vista) there is a new service called Native Image Service that does this tedious task of figuring out that certain assemblies needs to be re-NGen’ed and does that. You can use ceratin attributes in an assembly to give it better understanding of what to actually do with your assembly. You can read more about it here.
  • Another great post by Rico Mariani titled Six Questions About Generics and Performance.
  • An excellent two pieces post by Maoni about using GC Efficiently, Part1 and Part2.
  • Dodge Common Performance Pitfalls to Craft Speedy Applications using Reflection by Joel Pobar on this month’s (July) MSDN Magazine issue. It talks about imporvments of the reflection implementation in .NET 2.0 as well as the usage of some new APIs that lets you do things more quickly.Read, understand, let it sink in and by the time you’ll start working with it you’ll be better prepared.