Yesterday my RSS client, RSSBandit, decided to stop working.
Luckly RSSBandit is a .NET application with source code, so I’ve decided to start debugging it.
It kept on failing when it tried to deserialize one of its configuration classes from Xml using the XmlSerializer class.

The XmlSerializer class generates a temporary assembly in its constructor according to the XmlMapping it receives, compiles it and loads it.
Sometimes there is a problem at compile time. The code is not actually compiled and you will get a FileNotFoundException exception just for calling “new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyClass))“.

While trying to resolve this issue I’ve stumbled upon two tools that can help you better understand the cause of the problem and at some scenarios might suggest a resolution.

The first tools is a command line too called XmlSerializerPreCompiler written by Chris Sells. You just specify the full path to the assembly and the type name to check and it will try to create an XmlSerializer passing the type to it and analyzing the error.

The second one is a GUI tool that was based on XmlSerializerPreCompiler called XmlPreCompiler written by Mathew Nolton.

Both tools comes with full source code.

While I didn’t have time to check their source code I did see one of the things they use to get more information about the temporary assembly that is being compiled on the fly when creating the XmlSerializer.
It seems that there is a configuration flag that you put in the app.config file (if you don’t have one, just create one that is named myprogram.exe.config, where myprogram is your executeable name).

Just add the following to your app.config file:

<configuration>

<system.diagnostics>

<switches>

<add value=”4″ name=”XmlSerialization.Compilation”>

</switches>

</system.diagnostics>

</configuration>
This option tells the XmlSerializer not to delete the temporary files created to generate the temp assembly. It will leave the .cs file it was trying to compile, a .cmdline file which has the command line parameters that are sent to the compiler and a .out file which has the full command line that was used to compile the .cs file.

All of these files are generated it your %USERPROFILE%\Local Settings\Temp folder (which is usually equivalent to %TEMP%) and by just adding the above flag in your app.config you can get the input that is used in the programs I’ve mentioned above and investigate on your own.

While all of these programs couldn’t help me in resolving what is wrong with RSSBandit (and for that matter, any thing that has the “new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyClass))” code in it that runs on my machine) I’d thought it would be nice to share this information with everyone.

Since I don’t have time to further analyze this and I need my daily RSS feed dose, I did the following things:

  1. Ran WinDbg and started RSSBandit through it.
  2. Set a breakpoint (we have discussed about setting a managed breakpoint before) on System.CodeDom.Compiler.CompilerResults.get_CompiledAssembly (this function is the one that tries to load the temp compiled assembly and will throw the exception I’m getting in RSSBandit since the temp assembly wasn’t compiled).
  3. When the breakpoint hit (and it does so a few times until RSSBandit finishes loading) I ran !dumpheap -type CompilerResults
  4. I dumped the CompilerResults object using !dumpobject
  5. I then took the address of the pathToAssembly member and used !dumpobject on it as well.
  6. I then took the path, went there, opened the file named [strange random chars].out (where [strange random chars] is a unique name for each such assembly), opened it, copied the command line and ran it to generate the assembly.
  7. Continued doing this until we never reach the breakpoint again.

What I did learn from this workaround is that the main problem is executing the compiler command to compile the assembly and that will be the point from which I will continue to troubleshoot this issue.

At least for now RSSBandit is working (though only through WinDbg 😉 ) and I can read my favorite RSS feeds.